Tuesday 27 September 2016

Friday5: 5 Predictions for GoPro As A Media Company

Media companies look and feel fundamentally different in 2015 than they ever have before. They’re real-time (for better, or worse), they’re social and they are content driven. But, in a world where, as Richard Edelman put it, “The reader is now also content creator and advocate,” they also don’t have to be made up of traditional journalists and reporters.

Take GoPro. It currently distributes its owned content on Virgin Airlines, LG Smart TVs and recently, announced the spring launch of a Roku channel featuring a combination of original and user-submitted content. Here are five predictions for how this move could change our experience with GoPro, as a brand, moving forward:

1. Behind the Scenes Revamp

GoPro already has partnerships with the National Hockey League and the X-Games, where GoPros capture close-up footage during games. With cord cutters on the rise—steering away from traditional TV and cable, and instead opting to consume entertainment through an Internet connection in the home—Roku channels are a prime source of in-home entertainment. GoPro’s ability to push live or near real-time behind-the-scenes footage from live events, even if they aren’t streaming the whole event, could allow them to capture a new frame of relevancy.

2. Content Creators Connection

Vine and YouTube have shifted traditional notions of popularity, creating new tiers of celebrities where anybody has the opportunity to reach mass audiences with their content. Through GoPro’s newest distribution channel, content creators have another avenue to share. And, it’s one built on a powerful community connected by a central element: the shared experience of using the same tools. We may see social layers built to allow creators to connect with one another, and even collaborate on future products.

3. The GoPro Gap

There is still a consumer education element to GoPro’s actions that is necessary for it to succeed. Too many people are unaware of the amazing content they produce. Introducing a Roku channel is a smart way to start putting it in front of people. Next, it would make sense to see GoPro expand partnerships with Smart TVs to feature content on a channel of its own.

4. Shoppable Video

GoPro’s Roku channel will feature content that allows viewers to “learn which GoPro products were used to ‘get the shot.’” Social channels are becoming increasingly shoppable, allowing users to find products and click-to-buy from almost anywhere. This channel may allow GoPro to test videos where users can break down the content, identify what products (accessories, mounts, etc.) were used and buy them directly through their Roku.

5. Accessories get Stylized

We’ve seen fashion become an important factor in wearable devices, with top designers such as Rebecca Minkoff and Tory Burch leading the way. Consumers need devices to fit into their personal style; we may begin to see an increase in products and accessories designed in partnership with brands like Nike or North Face* to incorporate GoPro stylishly into gear. Imagine a snowboarding jacket with a GoPro chest mount built in, a bag with a GoPro compartment — compatibility that makes producing content on a GoPro more accessible, convenient and naturally integrated with daily life.

There are many other directions GoPro could take next, from a full-length feature film created solely on GoPro devices, to its own Snapchat channel on Discover. What are your predictions for GoPro’s next moves?

*Edelman client

Image credit: wales_gibbons

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EdelmanDigital/~3/z4bAO85ZQwM/friday5